Rss

Making Steel

OK, time for a little bit of business talk.  Part of what I do is called IT Service Delivery.  In fact, that’s my specialty if I have to have one.  I help companies improve their Information Technology Services.  Quite often companies have the right products for the job but somehow they just don’t seem to be getting the job done.  Well you might have a claw hammer but if you’re pounding the nail with the wrong end of the hammer head it’s not going to work very well.  That’s essentially what I do, I examine what companies do with their IT solutions and sometimes I point out that they might be using the wrong side of the hammer head.  Today, I’m thinking about the communication process.

I asked a lot of questions when I was a kid.  I guess I must have had a lot of questions about where babies came from because when I was about 5 years old my Dad felt the need to take me for a drive and tell me about the birds and bees.  This was a very basic and high level version of “the talk” but it was “the talk” regardless.  When he was finished with his awkward monologue my Dad glanced at me and noticed the puzzled look on my face.  “Do you understand all that?” he asked.

“Yeah.  I just have one question.” I replied.

“What’s that?”

“How does God make steel?”

I still take a ribbing from family members over that question to this day.

Trying to explain service delivery to an organization is often like trying to explain how god makes steel.  You really don’t know where to start but it’s clear that the question asked cannot be answered.  The question shows that there is an obvious lack of understanding in a few areas.

When we approach service delivery within any organization we are met with questions very similar to “How does god make steel?”.  We need to be able to recognize these questions because they help to define the line between understanding and confusion.  Part of developing the service delivery fabric is weeding out the areas of confusion and laying down a base of clear understanding.

The problem is that we have a tendency to ignore these questions and focus on developing processes.  We draw flow charts showing how to do things but we need to ensure that people understand the idea around the process.  Why do we do this?  What happens if we don’t do this? How does this help us reach a goal or desired result?

Successful service delivery is dependant on people not process.  The base skills of the people need to be developed before you can even think about a process.  The process is only as good as the people who use it.

Pay attention to the questions asked and find those points where your people lack a clear understanding.  Address those points before you spend too much time on detailed processes.  Smart, well-informed people will fall into the right process naturally.  Ill-informed people will struggle with any process and they will not delivery the way you need them to.

Leave a Reply